pardon

Begging Your Pardon: 5 Steps to Forgiving

As much as I hate to admit it, I stink at forgiveness.

 

When I was hurt, all I heard was, “You need to forgive and move on.” I was stumped, what exactly is forgiveness?

 

My first stop was the dictionary for the definition of forgiveness; “to grant pardon for or remission of an offense, debt, etc.”

 

The word that intrigued me was “pardon.”

 

I suddenly pictured a judge sitting behind a court bench pounding her gavel or, the president signing a presidential pardon saying, “You have received special dispensation and thus you are hereby pardoned of your offenses!”

 

This hit home the fact that I have the power and a choice to make.

 

I imagined someone with whom I had been holding onto some hurt. I pictured myself signing a decree that, from heretofore this person is officially pardoned.

 

“Forgiveness is me giving up my right to hurt you for hurting me.” ~Anonymous

 

I wasn’t condoning what they had done, I simply was saying I will no longer hang on to the negative energy that resulted from their actions. I felt the hurt begin to melt away.

 

I also pictured signing that executive pardon for all the embarrassing, hurtful and stupid things for which I judged myself.

 

If you’re struggling with forgiveness, give these steps a try:

  1.  Make a list of the people with whom you’re currently holding a grudge. Don’t forget to include yourself.
  2.  Go through the list and write down (or state out loud) what they did to hurt you. Dig deep, and don’t forget yourself.
  3.  Before moving to the pardon, ask yourself, “What did I learn from this experience?” Don’t skip this as it can help you see patterns of behavior and/or help to avoid repeats of the situations and people that you are now trying to forgive. Again, don’t forget yourself.
  4.  One at a time, imagine them standing before you. Declare that they are officially pardoned and bang your pretend (or real) gavel. Move on to the next person and, you guessed it, don’t forget yourself.
  5.  This takes practice. You may have to run certain people or situations through the courthouse more than once. However, if there are people and things you just aren’t able to forgive and move past, consider seeking support from a licensed therapist or counselor.

 

By taking a few minutes to forgive, we can free up energy to begin again with a clean slate. What a great way to say good bye to 2018 and welcome 2019!

 

Did this work for you or do you have another way that helps you practice forgiveness? Please let us know in the comments below.